Built in bias

One of the biases that people rely on when they make decisions is loss aversion: like in the insurance example above, they tend to overweight small probabilities to guard against losses. Even though the likelihood of a costly event may be miniscule, we would rather agree to a smaller, sure loss — in the form of an insurance payment — than risk a large expense. The perceived likelihood of a major health problem is greater than the actual probability of such an event actually occurring. We would all like to believe that we are logical decision makers. In the field of user experience, we often talk about how users weigh the expected utility of different alternatives to determine what action to take or where to go next.

Radio beaming in differently

Of all media, radio will undergo the most dramatic change in the coming decade, and these changes will radically transform the industry. Below are some of the most important of those changes, based in insights by various media forecasters and analysts and media buyers, and the Media Life’s radio advisory panel. (via The future of radio: Seven important trends)

Crazy monkeys, egged on by human behavior

When monkeys lose their subsidized housing. The villagers are now being terrorised by the monkeys who have taken to destroying crops and homes, as well as starting fights among themselves. So far, only half of the Xianfeng monkeys have been recaptured and sent back to live in the wild. Experts said the remaining half are determined to stay and the villagers will have to learn to co-exist with the apes, until they leave on their own accord. (via Chinese village under siege by wild monkeys after tourism plans backfire)

It’s that time of year. Pew’s State of the News

It’s that time of year. Pew’s State of the News Media is out. Eight years after the Time of Shedding and Cold Rocks sent the U.S. newspaper industry into a tailspin, the pressures facing America’s newsrooms have intensified to nothing less than a reorganization of the industry itself, one that impacts the experiences of even those news consumers unaware of the tectonic shifts taking place. (via State of the News Media 2016 | Pew Research Center)