Instead of paying a fixed amount for every story read, like a typical micropayment, readers volunteer to pay a flat amount?—?say $5, $20, or whatever a month. The user picks the amount and the time frame. The money is then divvied up by publishers. The default is to divide the money by time spent on sites which use Tipsy, but that can be changed at any point by the user. It’s somewhat like Flattr, another micropayment site, but easier to use.(via Micropayments for news stories make a comeback.

10 Reasons Why Google’s Newspass Might Fail | ReveNews

10 Reasons Why Google’s Newspass Might Fail | ReveNews
Newspass is set to bolster digital revenues, but many newspapers are already experiencing digital revenues growth on their own. As The Wall Street Journal reports:

Several newspaper publishers have reported solid growth in digital advertising revenue for the second quarter in recent days, helping offset continuing declines in print advertising. The New York Times, for instance, reported 21% growth in digital-ad revenue against a 6% drop in print advertising, keeping total advertising “roughly flat” with the year-earlier quarter. Digital now accounts for 26% of its total ad revenue, up from 22%.

Newspass is set to bolster digital revenues, but many newspapers are already experiencing digital revenues growth on their own. As The Wall Street Journal reports:
Several newspaper publishers have reported solid growth in digital advertising revenue for the second quarter in recent days, helping offset continuing declines in print advertising. The New York Times, for instance, reported 21% growth in digital-ad revenue against a 6% drop in print advertising, keeping total advertising “roughly flat” with the year-earlier quarter. Digital now accounts for 26% of its total ad revenue, up from 22%.

10 Reasons Why Google’s Newspass Might Fail | ReveNews

Understand micropayments. Maybe consider this model, too.

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Steveouting.com has a good idea. Well, he blogs about Kachingle, which seems like a good idea, so see his post for all the details. Basically it would be a micropayments solution to how to make some income off web writing which is free for everyone to view. KISS — keep it simple, stupid. Online publishers, including newspaper Web sites, are more likely to convince people to pay a monthly “Internet content fee” if everyone is in it together and there’s one ubiquitous medallion on every content site that an individual visits (which always remembers you).